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DOI, Digital Objetc Identifier 10.4185/RLCS-2019-1325en | ISSN 1138 - 5820 | RLCS, 74-2019 | Audio-visual explanation of the author |

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How to cite this article in bibliograhies / References

WR Sena Rivas, S Casillas Martín, M Cabezas González, A Barrientos (2019): “Educommunication in the context of youth and adult education in Latin America: A state of the art based on a systematic literature review”. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 74, pp. 133 a 171   .
http://www.revistalatinacs.org/074paper/1325/08en.html
DOI: 10.4185/RLCS-2018-1325en

Educommunication in the context of youth and adult education in Latin America: A state of the art based on a systematic literature review


Wiselis Rosanna Sena Rivas [CV] [o ORCID] [g GS]. PhD candidate at the University of Salamanca. Education in Knowledge Society Programme. Sponsored by the Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology (MESCYT) (Spain)  and Catholic University of Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) – wiselis@usal.es

Sonia Casillas Martín [CV] [o ORCID] [g GS]. Associated Professor. University of Salamanca (Spain) - scasillasma@usal.es

Marcos Cabezas González [CV] [o ORCID] [g GS]. Associated Professor. University of Salamanca (Spain). mcabezasgo@usal.es

Almudena Barrientos Bez [CV] [o ORCID] [g GS]. Associate Professor at the Iriarte University School of Tourism adscribed to the University of La Laguna, ULL (Tenerife-Spain) – almudenabarrientos@iriarteuniversidad.es

 

Abstract
Introduction: This research article presents a systematic literature review of the scientific production on the relationship between education and communication and youth and adult education in Latin America. Methods: Systematic literature review based on quantitative descriptive analysis and a qualitative approach applied on a sub-sample. Results: A total of 672 searches were carried out in the WOS and SCOPUS databases. Brazil and Mexico are the two countries most commonly taken as objects of study. In general terms, there is low scientific production in the area under study, especially when the search criteria restrict the object of study. With regards to the types of articles found, there is diversity in the formats used to disseminate research on this topic, although a dominant research design can be identified. Discussion and conclusions: Based on the 672 searches and the initial 5,420 results related to the object of study, it can be concluded that there is a very low scientific production, mainly dominated by mixed methodological techniques, with populations corresponding to countries and convenience samples; there is a preference for exploratory and heterogeneous research works. Brazil stands out as the most common object of study and there is, with some exceptions, some degree of correlation between the number of publications made by a country and the gross domestic product of such country. Finally, it is concluded that a dominant research design among the articles addressing Educommunication and youth and adult education in Latin America.
 
Keywords
Educommunication; Education; Communication; Youth and adult education; Latin America; Systematic literature review; Bibliometrics.

 
Contents
1. Introduction. 2. Theoretical framework. 2.1. Educommunication in the teaching-learning context. 2.2. Youth and adult education in Latin America. 2. 2.1. The role of the teacher in the context of adult basic education. 2.3. State of the art review. 3. Objectives, hypotheses and research questions. 4. Methods. 4.1. Quantitative analysis. 4.2. Qualitative-quantitative analysis. 4.3. Population and sample. 4.3.1. Countries included in the study. 4.4. Time period. 5. Results. 6. Discussion and conclusions. 7. References. 8. Annexes.
 

Translation by CA Martínez-Arcos
(PhD in Communication, University of London)

 [ Research ] [ Funded ] 
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1. Introduction

This article presents a systematic literature review of articles addressing education/communication and youth and adult education in Latin America. A thorough search was carried out in the WOS and Scopus databases, which resulted in a sample that is described in the methods section.

The objective is to present a state-of-the-art review based on high-impact articles, and to assess the scientific production in this area, to develop a first scientific basis suitable to continue working and delving into the study of basic education, especially youth and adult education, in Latin America.

The study departs from the idea that this type of education plays an especially relevant role in Latin America, particularly in certain countries, and therefore this education sub-system needs to be further developed. And obviously, in the 21st century, we cannot overlook the importance of communication and ICTs as an educational tools as well as the education sub-system addressed in this study.

2. Theoretical framework

2.1. Educommunication in the teaching-learning context

We can and must do everything within our reach as educators to transform information media into communication media. We must encourage and promote receptivity, criticism and creativity through these media. This is the main goal of total language teaching (Gutierrez, 1976: 32).

Close to the end of the second decade of the 21st century, there is an oversaturation of information and communication and new technologies are present in almost all activities people carry out on a daily basis. Communication is the foundation of social coexistence for every human being (Beltrão, 1977 and Bordenave, 2005: 16-17) and that this discipline has always been present in the field of education. Without basic communication, both verbal and non-verbal, it would be very difficult to establish a correct information flow that would positively affect the teaching-learning process. Moreover, in some way, Communication and Education, as academic disciplines, have complemented each other, although this understanding seems to have found greater interconnection since the advent of the Internet and especially after the 21st century.

Días (2011: 56-57) has made a list of the most relevant technologies that have been made available to teachers throughout history: video, videotape, videodisc, satellite communication, teletext, video games, videotext, audiotext, hypertext, mobile telephony, online journals, blogs, digital cable television, pay TV, and subscription-based TV, and even interactive TV and high definition TV (HDTV). Días (2011: 58) rightly points out that:

This leads us to conceive education as the full formation of the individual in which the almost infinite potentialities of communication occupy a central and determinant place for social transformations and for the power attributed to those peoples and nations that collect information and new knowledge.

All this without forgetting today’s most-used device: the computer (both desktop and laptop). Communication has always been incorporated into education and it has been used to a greater or lesser extent depending on diverse factors, such as the socio-cultural and economic development of countries, their educational systems, education levels and sub-systems. But always bearing in mind that:

… formal teaching environments (schools at all levels, including universities) and informal teaching environments (home, church and community) cannot overlook the existence and influence of the media in the process of citizen formation, from the most classical view (teaching-learning) to the most alternative perspective (innovation-experiments/discoveries) (Días, 2011:80).

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), in general terms, favour a very different type of learning centre which is often influenced by the media (Gutiérrez, 1976). We cannot overlook the presence of these media and their significant capacity to be part of the teaching-learning process, either directly or indirectly, from humans’ early stages of development:

The idea is to take advantage of the resources existing outside the teaching centre to learn in situ (visits, field studies, etc.) or, at least, use audiovisual resources (photos, cinema, video, slides, etc.) that allow us to have certain contact, even if indirect, with the reality of what we study (García-Valcárcel, 2001:18)

In the same vein, García, Callejo and Walzer (2004) emphasise the importance of television as an educational element, taking into account that it is a primary medium in the social, family and home environments. Some even refer to television as a “parallel” school (Vallet, 1970), although it is not the objective of this work to analyse this controversy, nor the pros and cons around this view.

What does seem to be clear is that school educates but so does the media. The educator must be aware of this and that is why educators have, largely, used the media as tools to improve that process.

In early ages, particularly childhood but also adolescence, the figure of the educator is essential and the need for direct contact between teacher and pupil is indisputable. Where the educational world has begun to change in relation to this aspect is in higher education -in the university in particular- where e-learning has emerged with enormous strength.

Within the adult world, perhaps media tools and ICT should be understood as an advantage and not as a threat and with a very important characteristic: virtual relations (Sabater, Martínez and Santiago, 2017). The educator must know how to manage and take advantage of all the new ICT to turn the teaching-learning process into a dynamic and entertaining as well as enriching and valuable method (Herrero-Gutiérrez and García-Valcárcel, 2015). In some way, the teacher acquires the role of gatekeeper for the enormous amount of knowledge that ICT, the Internet and the media put within the reach of society.

The educational system “must take the lead to bring some order to the knowledge typical of the mosaic culture” (Días, 2011:83) and try to “incorporate to schools and universities methods that teach to select and teach to learn, in the perspective of Delors (1996); Morin (1999) and Perrenoud (2004)” (Días, 2011:83), which will lead the teacher to personal recycling.

2.2. Youth and adult education in Latin America

The current state of Education in Latin America is characterised by various factors that influence it as parameters of action and provide elements of which the education processes derive (Sena-Rivas, 2013). To this end, in the last thirty years, national documents, legal reforms and comparative studies have been produced to face the challenges of a globalised world in Latin America.

Acencio, Valiente, Triviño and Gutiérrez (2017), after reviewing the national legislations of 16 Latin American countries, conclude that the challenges of Latin America are encompassed in two macro-perspectives. First, the framework that refers to the formation of the individual for his development as a person coherent with the social environment, in the cultural aspect, and the development of his capacity. Second, they point out the strategic contributions of education to face and overcome the challenges of this century. This allows us to delimit the characteristics that warn us about the need to develop scientific models and to assume universal priorities to increase the quality of education in the 21st century. According to Cruz (2017), we live in a global society that gradually uses information and knowledge and, as a result, depends increasingly less on manual labour due to the increasing use of automation process. However, education plays a crucial role because, as García, Albolatrach, Gómez and Ortega (2017) point out, the principles underpinning the formation of political and ideological values are established through education, as well as the influence to transform societies and improve vocational training. Faced with this reality, Amelia, Reyes and Colmenárez (2017) conducted a literature review and concluded that Latin American countries continue to face the same challenges they faced in past decades, despite constant strategies to overcome the current condition.

To understand the previous situation, we must emphasise that youth and adult education represents an opportunity to establish the foundations of major social changes. It is a different education that has essential characteristics that must be considered. It emerges as a result of a problem of formal education, at early ages, and social inequalities, characterised by people living in situations of poverty and social exclusion (Sena-Rivas, 2013).

Bonder (2008) notes that social research works in Latin America have as common object of study marginal groups, whose particularities depend on the context, sexual orientation, family, neighbourhood, school and work history. To respond to this reality, these works encourage the development of a set of initiatives framed within innovation processes. These processes should be planned through social practices that take into account the new social division of labour. In this sense, since the 1990s, a set of reforms were made focusing on the impact of equity to clarify specific changes in the education sector. In that regard, Andrade Oliveira and Feldfeber (2016) compared the legacies of recent reforms and concluded that at this new stage there is a hegemonic dispute, in which neoliberalism and post-neoliberalism coexist in a complex and contradictory manner. The educational reforms assume responsibly those offers that allow focusing on specific objectives, around the central elements of those policies that determine the practices that are associated to excluded sectors and give space to market and civil society and, at the same time, transfer responsibilities to schools and families. In this same line, Rivero (2009) points out that youth and adult education represents a right associated with the constant evolution occurring in the educational context, specifically in functional and absolute illiteracy. Therefore, publications in Latin America usually address it from the perspective of constructivism and according to, Becerra (2016), are divided into three groups: those that seek to explain constructivism based on field problems; those that take developments in constructivism as an object of critical study; and those that adopt constructivism as a framework for national and conceptual analyses.

In this regard, youth and adult education is addressed from four dimensions: being, knowing, deciding and doing. According to Ghiso (2016), to do this, it is necessary to build the speciality of the social pedagogue on a proposal of endogenous professionalisation; i.e., to frame popular education within ethno-education despite being an area under construction and dispute; given the nature of the tacit knowledge that has characterised it over the course of the years.

2.2.1. The role of the teacher in the context of adult basic education

As a result of this process, the understanding of the role of adult education has changed significantly compared to the last decade, acquiring an importance that implies a philosophy linked to formal education based on theories that delimit the peculiarity of the process in behavioural, cognitive models of education for life and work. That is, an education that is open to dialogue, and critical of political constraints, associated to numerous factors related to age which are modified according to personal circumstances and enrich knowledge, framed in lifelong learning. Since 2000, there has been an increase in programmes that promote policies that privilege this context.

Souza, Adenilson and Gomes (2018) point out that the academic and professional training of teachers for youth and adult education is non-existent as a career. There are courses that guide this kind of training, approaching the discipline that discusses youth and adult education in the curricular structure. They claim that almost in all of Latin America there is an absence of education “for educators” of young and adult people as a career or college degree, which in some way may also influence the teaching-learning process of this group. This has occurred despite the fact that youth and adult education is a key area to build fair and sustainable societies.

Probably, this stagnation in the teaching process that we are addressing as an object of study is also influenced by the low presence of ICT and Communication within the aforementioned field, which should be further studied:

It is necessary and prudent to highlight the digital training of teachers to generate the impulse of new strategies mediated by the new communication and information platforms. To break into the current paradigms and include innovative activities and means or resources that facilitate the learning process in the population attending these programs (Sena-Rivas, 2017: 89).

2.3. State of the art review

Based on the previous situation, it is appropriate and relevant to know the state of the art of our object of study. In other words: to know what is being researched and what are the interests of scientists in this aspect. The premise is that the scientific world addresses what can in turn affect the reality of the youth and adult education subsystems. Science, in this sense, should positively influence and help to improve the teaching-learning systems in this group.

3. Objectives, hypotheses and research questions

The study is guided by the following research questions:

RQ 1: How many high-impact research works have been made on Educommunication in Latin America, and each of its countries, separately, as objects of study?

RQ 2: How many high-impact research works have been made on Educommunication in Latin America and relate Educommunication with youth and adult education?

RQ 3: What types of research works are being produced?

Based on these questions, the general objective is to perform a systematic review of the literature that examines the relationship between Latin America and the use of communication, whether this correlation exists, in the educational processes of youth and adult teaching-learning. To be precise, this objective involves the following two specific objectives:

O1: Quantify the scientific works (journal articles) that relate Educommunication, youth and adult education and Latin America and take countries as their object of study, based on the review of WOS and SCOPUS databases.

O2: Analyse the most relevant production after a previous selection.

The initial hypotheses are as follows:

H1: There is a low scientific production relating Educommunication with young and adult education in Latin America.

H2: Brazil, the country with the highest Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in Latin America, produces the largest number of studies in this topic.

H3: There is no dominant research design on articles that address research on Educommunication and youth and adult education in Latin America.

4. Methods

The study is based on the systematic literature review method, approached from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives (Hidalgo-Marí et al., unpublished). However, since this is a bibliometric study, the quantitative approach will prevail over the qualitative, as Compte Pujol, Matilla and Hernández (2018) point out in a text backed up by a wide literature specialised in bibliometrics.

Since the objective is to approach the state of the art, we believe that this method of literature review is the most suitable. Systematic review emerged as a method in the health sciences (Berveley, Booth and Bath, 2003), in the field of medicine, and can be defined as:

… a rigorous and thorough research method with a transparent and reproducible process, which includes establishment of specific research questions; formulation of inclusion/exclusion criteria; a rigorous, reproducible and transparent retrieval process; and quality assessment of included studies, as well as data extraction, synthesis, analysis, and presentation (Xu, Kang and Song, 2015: 296).

 
Due to the enormous number of articles, this type of method allows greater insight into the published works on a particular object of study, as well as into advances, through a type of review that is focused on systematic analysis (Xu Kang and Song, 2015: 296).

With the passage of time, the systematic literature review has expanded to other areas of knowledge, including social sciences (Petticrew and Roberts, 2006; Ferreras-Fernández, 2016 and Mangas-Vega, 2018), which is the field addressed in this study. In fact, some authors (Togerson, 2003) propose that all research works should be preceded by a review of this type.

The systematic literature review method can be used in two ways: as a complement to a wider research (Codina, 2015) or as a study in itself (Galán et al., unpublished).

Given the thematic relevance under study and considering the potential of the systematic literature review method, in this case it is presented as a study in itself, to highlight the panorama on the selected topic. Thus, we will review the literature to place it in perspective (Ramos, Ramos and Romero, 2003); such a process will be developed to “identify the main part of a literature review; to this end we extract the most relevant works based on previously established criteria” (Galán, et al., unpublished) in order to inform about the state of the art (Guirao and Silamani, 2015), very mindful of the importance of establishing inclusion and exclusion criteria with precision to avoid bias, which is of vital importance: “the systematic review synthesises the results of other research works through strategies to avoid bias. These tactics are based primarily on the search for high-impact articles, with clear and reproducible criteria” (Galán et al., unpublished).

This is a type of quantitative tool, but we also aim to use it qualitatively to overcome the limitations of the quantitative approach. Perhaps the qualitative part may cause some kind of interpretation on the part of encoders, but we will try to establish variables with the lowest subjectivity possible.

Due to the exhaustiveness that we aim to implement, it is very important to design a data collection sheet, especially on those aspects that will have a more qualitative interpretation. Therefore, the method, with its search and analysis criteria, should be systematic and try to reduce coders’ interpretations to the minimum.

In this sense, authors such as Codina (2015) point out that “the systematic concept means that it is not arbitrary or biased, and that the best sources have been used” (Galán et al., unpublished, citing Codina, 2015).

4.1. Quantitative analysis

First, we performed the quantitative analysis focused on Latin America. A systematic review of articles in WOS and SCOPUS databases was performed based on the following criteria (tables 1 and 2)

Table 1. Search criteria for data collection in WOS 

ID

Search language

Keywords 1

Keywords 2

Additional keyword

Search field

R

Filter

R

Filter 2

R

1

Spanish

Educa*, Comunic*

Each Latin American country
(in Spanish and English)
+ search with “Latin America”
(in English and Spanish),
as appropriate

 

Title

WOS categories with the words “Education”, “Communication” and “Social sciences”
 
 

At least 1 citation

2

Spanish

Educa*, Comunic*

Jov* AND adul*

Without filter 2

3

English

Educat*, Communic*

 

At least 1 citation

4

English

Educat*, Communic*

Yout* AND adul*

Without filter 2

5

Spanish

Educom*

 

At least 1 citation

6

Spanish

Educom*

Jov* AND adul*

Without filter 2

7

English

Educomm*

 

At least 1 citation

8

English

Educomm*

Yout* AND adul*

Without filter 2

9

Spanish

Educa*, Comunic*

 

Theme

At least 15 citations

10

Spanish

Educa*, Comunic*

Jov* AND adul*

Without filter 2

11

English

Educat*, Communic*

 

At least 15 citations

12

English

Educat*, Communic*

Yout* AND adul*

Without filter 2

13

Spanish

Educom*

 

At least 15 citations

14

Spanish

Educom*

Jov* AND adul*

Without filter 2

15

English

Educomm*

 

At least 15 citations

16

English

Educomm*

Yout* AND adul*

Without filter 2

Source: Authors’ own creation.

Table 2. Search criteria for data collection in SCOPUS

ID

Language of search

Keywords 1

Keywords 2

Additional keyword

Search field

R

Filter 1

Filter 2

R

1

Spanish

Educa*, Comunic*

Each Latin
American country
(in Spanish
and English)
+ search with
“Latin America”
(in English
and Spanish),
as appropriate

 

Title

Thematic area: “Social sciences”
 
 

At least 1 citation

2

Spanish

Educa*, Comunic*

Jov* AND adul*

Without filter 2

3

English

Educat*, Communic*

 

At least 1 citation

4

English

Educat*, Communic*

Yout* AND adul*

Without filter 2

5

Spanish

Educom*

 

At least 1 citation

6

Spanish

Educom*

Jov* AND adul*

Without filter 2

7

English

Educomm*

 

At least 1 citation

8

English

Educomm*

Yout* AND adul*

Without filter 2

9

Spanish

Educa*, Comunic*

 

Theme

At least 10 citations

10

Spanish

Educa*, Comunic*

Jov* AND adul*

Without filter 2

11

English

Educat*, Communic*

 

At least 10 citations

12

English

Educat*, Communic*

Yout* AND adul*

Without filter 2

13

Spanish

Educom*

 

At least 10 citations

14

Spanish

Educom*

Jov* AND adul*

Without filter 2

15

English

Educomm*

 

At least 10 citations

16

English

Educomm*

Yout* AND adul*

Without filter 2

Source: Authors’ own creation.

With regards to the collections, in WOS the search was performed in the Core Collection, selecting the “all years” period, and including SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, A&HCI and ESCI (figure 1). In SCOPUS, initially, there were any restrictions other than the ones listed above. The review took into account the articles published by 1 July 2018.

Image 1. Search collections in WOS

1
Source: screenshot from WOS.

These search criteria were used to review the literature on “Latin America” in global terms, but also in a country-by-country basis.

4.2. Qualitative-quantitative analysis

The second stage of research consisted of a mainly quantitative analysis, but with some qualitative variables, on certain articles: the ones related the most to our object of study and which became the selected sample. The following analysis sheet (Table 3) was applied on those articles:

Table 3. Qualitative-quantitative analysis sheet 

Title of the article

Indicate title of the article

Journal

Specify name of the publication

Country where the Journal is published

Specify country

Branch of knowledge

Education / communication / both / other

Language 1

Specify number of languages in which the article is published (full text)

Language 2

Specify the language or languages of publication: English / Spanish / Portuguese / German / French / Italian / other

Number of authors

Specify the number of authors

Article source: university

Specify the University of origin. In the case of multiple authors, the data of the first author will be considered

Source of the article: country

Specify the country of origin. In the case of multiple authors, the data of the first author will be considered

Year of publication

Specify the year in which it was published

Index

WOS / Scopus / both

WOS citations

Number of citations in WOS / not applicable

SCOPUS citations

Number of citations in SCOPUS / not applicable

Concepts addressed in article

Both concepts: education and communication: yes / no

Country in which the study focuses

Identify the country in which the study focuses

Method 1 (multiple answer)

Quantitative / qualitative / both

Method 2 (multiple answer)

Tools used (mark where applicable)

  • Survey
  • Content analysis
  • Interviews
  • Discourse analysis
  • Others. Specify

Method 3 (multiple answer)

Methodological procedure. Elaborate on variable in “method 2”. Short open response

Population

Identify the population on which the article is based. Specify as appropriate

  • City or less (including local and multi local case studies)
  • Province
  • Community / Region
  • Country
  • Continent
  • World

Sample

Specify the selected sample and inclusion and exclusion criteria: Yes / No

Results 1

Specify whether it has a synthesis of results: Yes / No

Results 2

Form of presenting results
Text: yes / no
Graphics: yes / no
Tables without statistical data: yes / no
Tables with statistical data: yes / no
Images / figures: yes / no

Conclusions

Existence of interpretation of results: yes / no

Authors’ own creation based on Galán et al., unpublished, Hidalgo et al., unpublished; Xu et al., 2015).
 

4.3. Population and sample

The population for the quantitative phase consists of the entire database of WOS and ScopuS. This study does not use a sample and instead carries out a comprehensive analysis based on the aforementioned criteria and the selected collections.

For the qualitative-quantitative phase, a sample was selected using the following criteria:

ScopuS: Search in title: educ* OR com* AND adul* AND yout* OR jov* AND latin* OR [+ each of the countries] (limitations: social sciences and research articles).

The following formula was used to search in SCOPUS:

( TITLE ( educ* )  OR  TITLE ( com* )  AND  TITLE ( adul* )  AND  TITLE ( yout* )  OR  TITLE ( jov* )  AND  TITLE
( latin* )  OR  TITLE ( arg* )  OR  TITLE ( boliv* )  OR  TITLE ( bras* )  OR  TITLE ( braz* )  OR  TITLE ( col )  OR  TITLE ( cost* )  OR  TITLE ( cub* )  OR  TITLE ( dominic* )  OR  TITLE ( ecua* )  OR  TITLE ( salv* )  OR  TITLE
( guatem* )  OR  TITLE ( hond* )  OR  TITLE ( mex* )  OR  TITLE ( nicar* )  OR  TITLE ( panam* )  OR  TITLE
( parag* )  OR  TITLE ( peru* )  OR  TITLE ( puert* )  OR  TITLE ( urug* )  OR  TITLE ( venez* )  OR  TITLE
( chile* ) AND  ( LIMIT-TO ( DOCTYPE ,  "ar" ) )  AND  ( LIMIT-TO ( SUBJAREA ,  "SOCI" )

The search returned 16 results (annex 2). Then, a similar search was conducted in WOS, returning a total of 29 articles (annex 1). We must bear in mind that this sample includes duplicated articles (i.e., belonging to both databases) and that to complete the study the search also included the numbers 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 and 32 (see annex 4). Thus, we included articles that returned from this triple search (annexes 1, 2 and 4). From these articles, we selected a sub-sample formed by those articles that had direct relationship with our object of study, according to encoders’ appreciative criteria. The analysis sheet (table 3), described in the previous section, was applied on this sub-sample.

4.3.1. Countries included in the study

The sample included the following countries, which were searched for individually and separately and according to the following keywords:

América Latina à Latin America (Search: “Améri*” AND “Latin*” / “Latin*” AND “America*”)
Argentina / Argentina à Argent*
Bolivia / Bolivia à Boliv*
Brasil / Brazil à Bras* / Braz*
Chile / Chile à Chile*
Colombia / Colombia à Colomb*
Costa Rica / Costa Rica (search: “Costa” AND “Rica”, both Spanish and English) à Cost* AND Ric*
Cuba / Cuba à Cuba*
República Dominicana / Dominican Republic (search “República” AND “Dominicana” / “Dominican” AND “Republic”) à Repub* AND Domini* / Dominic*
Ecuador / Ecuador à Ecuad*
El Salvador / Republic of The Salvador) à Salvad*
Guatemala / Guatemala à Guatema*
Honduras / Honduras à Hondu*
México / Mexico à Mex* Mej*
Nicaragua / Nicaragua à Nicarg*
Panamá / Panama à Panam*
Paraguay / Paraguay à Parag*
Perú / Peru à Peru*
Puerto Rico / Puerto Rico (search: “Puerto” AND “Rico”, tanto en español como inglés) à Puert* AND Ric*
Uruguay / Uruguay à Urug*
Venezuela / Venezuela à Venez*

4.4. Time period and language

Only articles published by 1 July 2018 were considered in the sample. The analysis was performed during the entire month of July 2018 by a team of four researchers.

Regarding the keywords, based on the parameters used, it is interesting to point out that apart from searches in Spanish and English, the searches also returned all results found in Portuguese, which is very interesting considering the analysis of Brazil.

5. Results

The first thing that should be noted is that 672 searches were performed in the WOS and Scopus databases (32 searches (16 in WOS and 16 in Scopus) * 20 countries + Latin America). The general quantitative results are presented below in Table 4, Figure 1 and Table 5, which present the scientific production that exists when we take each country as an object of study. These data reflect the total scientific production which has been found in the two databases, taking each of these countries separately + Latin America; and also presenting the total.

Table 4. Summary of articles found in total

TOTAL WOS

TOTAL SCOPUS

TOTAL

Latin America

433

26

459

Argentina

101

113

214

Bolivia

31

43

74

Brazil

578

772

1,350

Chile

175

222

397

Colombia

191

249

440

Costa Rica

72

58

130

Cuba

67

109

176

Dominican Rep.

33

39

72

Ecuador

94

97

191

El Salvador

39

60

99

Guatemala

29

41

70

Honduras

19

32

51

Mexico

475

607

1,082

Nicaragua

17

21

38

Panama

11

17

28

Paraguay

36

70

106

Peru

60

125

185

Puerto Rico

59

73

132

Uruguay

13

33

46

Venezuela

32

48

80

TOTAL

2,565

2,855

5,420

47.32%

52.68%

100.00%

Source: Authors’ own creation.

Figure 1. Total scientific production by country.

0
Source: Authors’ own creation.
 

Table 5. Summary of articles found according search type (II), legend: see annex 3

Search *see annex 3 / Country

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latin America WOS

0

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

374

12

3

0

3

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

27

3

0

0

0

0

Latin America SCOPUS

0

0

6

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

4

1

0

1

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

Argentina WOS

0

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

88

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

Argentina SCOPUS

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

103

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Bolivia WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

28

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

Bolivia SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

36

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

Brazil WOS

0

0

8

1

0

0

3

0

5

1

525

15

0

0

5

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

2

0

0

0

6

4

0

0

0

1

Brazil SCOPUS

3

0

0

0

3

0

4

0

6

0

709

15

0

0

5

0

2

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

18

5

0

0

0

0

Chile WOS

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

165

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

1

0

0

0

0

Chile SCOPUS

15

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

184

1

1

0

1

0

4

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

11

0

0

0

0

0

Colombia WOS

0

0

3

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

180

0

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Colombia SCOPUS

3

0

4

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

225

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

9

1

0

0

0

0

Costa Rica WOS

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

66

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

SCOPUS Costa Rica

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

51

0

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Cuba WOS

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

61

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Cuba SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

102

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

Dominican Rep. WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

26

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

1

0

0

0

0

Dominican R. SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

35

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

Ecuador WOS

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

84

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

0

0

0

0

Ecuador SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

92

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

El Salvador WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

34

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

1

0

0

0

0

El Salvador SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

55

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

1

0

0

0

0

Guatemala WOS

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

28

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Guatemala SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

40

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Honduras WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Honduras SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

31

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Mexico WOS

0

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

447

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

1

0

0

0

0

Mexico SCOPUS

2

0

8

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

526

14

0

0

0

0

1

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

41

3

0

0

0

0

Nicaragua WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

16

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Nicaragua SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

19

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Panama WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

11

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Panama SCOPUS

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

15

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Paraguay WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

28

1

7

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Paraguay SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

63

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

0

0

0

0

Peru WOS

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

56

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Peru SCOPUS

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

119

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Puerto Rico WOS

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

54

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Puerto Rico SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

64

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

0

0

0

0

0

Uruguay WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

13

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

SCOPUS Uruguay

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

29

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Venezuela WOS

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

30

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Venezuela SCOPUS

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

44

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

Source: Authors’ own creation (type of search: see annex 3).

 The following image presents the mapping of the search results of articles for each country (Image 2).
 

Image 2. Mapping of scientific production by country.

3
Source: Authors’ own creation.

 
In global terms, the three countries most frequently taken as an object of study in this field are, in this order: Brazil (24.91%), Mexico (19.96%) and Colombia (8.12%). Latin America, as a search term, stands at 8.47%. On the opposite side, the countries that are chosen as object of study in a percentage under 1% are: Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and Uruguay.

As for the correlation between Education, Communication, Educommunication and youth and adult education in Latin America, the articles hardly yielded any results (table 6). In total, 32 articles were found (table 6); after discarding duplicates (for being present in both databases), the total number was 23 (table 7 and annex 4).

Table 6. Number of articles that relate Education, Communication and Educommunication with youth and adult education in Latin America

Search / Country

18

20

22

24

26

28

30

32

TOTAL

Latin America WOS

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

3

Latin America SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

4

Argentina WOS

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

Argentina SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Bolivia WOS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Bolivia SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Brazil WOS

0

1

0

0

0

4

0

1

6

Brazil SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

0

5

Chile WOS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Chile SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Colombia WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Colombia SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Costa Rica WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

SCOPUS Costa Rica

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Cuba WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Cuba SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Dominican Republic WOS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Dominican R. SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Ecuador WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Ecuador SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

El Salvador WOS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

El Salvador SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Guatemala WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Guatemala SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Honduras WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Honduras SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mexico WOS

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Mexico SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

3

Nicaragua WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Nicaragua SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Panama WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Panama SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Paraguay WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Paraguay SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Peru WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Peru SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Puerto Rico WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Puerto Rico SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Uruguay WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

SCOPUS Uruguay

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Venezuela WOS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Venezuela SCOPUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

TOTAL

0

1

0

0

0

30

0

1

32

Source: Authors’ own creation
 

Table 7. articles that relate Education, Communication and Educommunication with youth and adult education in Latin America in WOS and SCOPUS (32 minus duplicates = 23)

Article (named as it appears in the database)

Journal (named as it appears in the database)

Youth, gender & TIC: Imaginaries in the construction of information society in Latin American

ARBOR-CIENCIA PENSAMIENTO Y CULTURA

Interpersonal and personal factors influencing sexual debut among Mexican-American young women in the United States

JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH

Evaluation of a school-based sex education program for low income male high school students in Chile

EVALUATION AND PROGRAM PLANNING

Why the American public supports twenty-first century learning.

New directions for youth development

The Foundation and youth programs in Latin America and the Caribbean. Thinking about tomorrow | [La Fundacion y los programas juveniles en America Latina y el Caribe. Pensando en el manana.]

Desarrollo de base: revista de la Fundación Interamericana

Music as an experience integral to the ethnicity of the Mbya-Guarani of South America

MUSIC EDUCATION RESEARCH

A curriculum for action in the community and intercultural citizenship in higher education

LANGUAGE CULTURE AND CURRICULUM

Multilingual education policy and practice: Ten certainties (grounded in Indigenous experience)

Conferencia: Annual Conference of the American-Association-for-Applied-Linguistics

Mapping of Information and Communication Technologies in Youth and Adult Education in the Northeast of Brazil

REVISTA EDUCAONLINE

The digital technologies of information and communication in the context of youth and adult education: a literature review (2007-2014)

REVISTA OLHRES

Social education and youth public policy: socio-educational experiences in Brazil and Portugal

REVISTA IBERO-AMERICANA DE ESTUDOS EM EDUCACAO

A quantitative approach to the television programs aimed to child and youth audience in Brazil

COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY-SPAIN

Education of young people and adults: a proposal for literacy and initiation to professionalization

LAPLAGE EM REVISTA

Studying the effects of an EFL curriculum for young adults in Brazil

English Language Teaching

Youth and adult Education: Contributions of papers in Brazilian journals indexed in SciELO database (2010-2014) | [Educação de jovens e adultos: Contribuições de artigos em periódicos Brasileiros indexados na base SciELO (2010-2014)]

Cadernos CEDES

Maria Teixeira School: A proposal for innovation in educational technology for social inclusion

2014 IEEE Canada International Humanitarian Technology Conference, IHTC

Evaluation of a school-based sex education program for low income male high school students in Chile

EVALUATION AND PROGRAM PLANNING

Implementation of ict in the Dominican Republic. an approach to teachers' perception

FONSECA-JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION

Smoking in Ecuador: Prevalence, knowledge, and attitudes

Tobacco Control

Migration and the Pursuit of Education in Southern Mexico

COMPARATIVE EDUCATION REVIEW

Playing school with a screen and a keyboard | [Jugar a la escuela con pantalla y teclado]

Education Policy Analysis Archives

Mathematical literacy and its development through elementary-education programs and occupations that do not require much schooling | [La alfabetización matemática y su relación con el intercambio comercial, la escolaridad elemental y el trabajo]

Bolema - Mathematics Education Bulletin

Multiple marginality and Urban education: Community and school socialization among low-income Mexican-descent youth

Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk

Source: Authors’ own creation.

Having advanced to the qualitative phase and having obtained the sub-sample, according to the criteria set in the methods section, we obtained a total of 18 articles (present in the various annexes, marked with the numbers 1, 2, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13, 22, 33 36, 37, 41, 42, 51, 54, 56, 57 and 59). Other articles related to topics such as the relationship between depression and education, religious education, environmental education, sex education, technological education applied to romance and sex, medical education, disability and studies about psychology and psychiatry.

In order to resolve the third hypothesis, the 18 articles selected for the sub-sample were analysed in the following aspects: first, generic features and object of study (table 8), followed by methodological traits, population and sample (table 9) and, finally, data on results (table 10).

Table 8. Generic features of articles

Discipline

Education

50%

Education and communication

50%

 

Number of languages

1

94.4%

2 or more

5.6%

 

Main language of publication

Spanish

27.8%

English

27.8%

Portuguese

44.4%

 

Number of authors

1

38.9%

2

50%

4

5.6%

5

5.6%

 

Country of origin of article

Ecuador

5.6%

United States

11.1%

Brazil

50%

Uruguay

5.6%

Bolivia

5.6%

Mexico

5.6%

Spain

5.6%

Unspecified

11.1%

 

Country under study as object of study

Latin America (generic)

27.8%

Brazil

50%

Uruguay

5.6%

Bolivia

5.6%

Mexico

5.6%

Dominican Rep.

5.6%

 

Publication period

2008-2013

22.4%

2014-2018

77.6%

Source: Authors’ own creation.
 

Table 9. Methods of articles

Approach

Qualitative

33.3%

Quantitative

27.8%

Both

22.2%

Unspecified

16.7%

 

 

 

Method

Survey

16.7%

Content analysis

5.6%

Interview

5.6%

Historicist

11.1%

Mapping

16.7%

Comparative analysis

11.1%

Experiment

16.7%

Unspecified

16.7%

 

 

 

Population

City or less (including local and multi-local case studies)

11.1%

Province

5.6%

Country

55.6%

Continent

27.8%

 

 

 

Sample

Sample = population

5.6%

Convenience

38.9%

Random

5.6%

Not clearly specified / other cases

50%

Source: Authors’ own creation.

Table 10. Results and conclusions of the articles

Existence of synthesis of results

Yes

77.8%

No

22.2%

Drafting of results

Yes

94.4%

No

5.6%

Figures

Yes

22.2%

No

77.8%

Tables

Yes

38.9%

No

61.1%

Statistics

Yes

16.7%

No

83.3%

Images

Yes

22.2%

No

77.8%

Conclusions and interpretation of results

Yes

88.9%

No

11.1%

Source: Authors’ own creation.

6. Discussion and conclusions

First of all, it is important to highlight the fact that the global scientific production is very similar among the articles found in WOS and SCOPUS. Two countries, Brazil and Mexico, stand out as objects of study in the field of “Education and communication”, in all its possible searches.

When it comes to relating education, communication and Educommunication with youth and adult education in Latin America, the scientific production is really scarce and there are hardly any results in the form of articles published in high impact-factor journals. Of the 5,420 results found in global terms, only thirty address the relationship between “Education”, “Communication”, “Youth and adult people”. Therefore, we can conclude that, at least in terms of high-impact-factor articles, there is a very low production and it is necessary to continue delving and promote the visibility of this field. Thus, we have confirmed the first hypothesis. Future lines of research will enable us to continue carrying out searches in another databases and find out whether the literature is greater when we focus on low-impact literature (for example, in PhD theses, conference proceedings, etc.).

On the other hand, having analysed the results and carried out the corresponding mapping by countries, Brazil is the country most frequently taken as object of study, which confirms the second hypothesis. In this sense, we can point out that the low production that exists on certain countries can be due to the fact that their education systems have not been sufficiently implemented yet and their GDP are generally low.

However, and highlighting the previous idea, the production is negligible in general terms when we try to relate to Communication with ICTs within Education, and applying all this to youth and adult education.

Finally, based on the results and the analysis of articles from a qualitative and quantitative point of view, there is a prototype research article addressing the relationship between Educommunication and young and adult education in Latin America.

In this sense, the research prototype that we found is an article addressing only Education, or in combination with Communication, published in a single language, usually Portuguese (correlated with Brazil as one of the most relevant countries), signed by 1 or 2 authors, produced in Brazil, taking Latin America as object of study (generic) and published in the last 5 years. The method is preferably quantitative, based on various techniques (survey, mapping, experiment...) with a population that by rule is a country, with non-clearly specified or convenience samples. Most of these articles present a synthesis of results, in written form, and in more than 50% of cases are not accompanied by graphics, tables, statistics or images. Based on the previous, the third hypothesis is rejected.

In general terms, the research warns of the unfortunate low scientific production in this very specific subject. The object of study has been reduced to the correlation between youth and adult education and the concept of “Educommunication”, understanding that communication is a vital tool in any type of teaching-learning process, including the one addressed in this text. However, production is really scarce. Adult education plays a fundamental role in many Latin American countries, for the reasons described throughout this text. Many Latin American governments also feel this way and enhance this education sub-system. Moreover, taking into account the current importance of ICT in learning processes, it is essential to continue encouraging this type of education mediated by the aforementioned ICTs. And to make this possible, it is necessary to continue addressing this field from a scientific point of view, with the clear objective of improving all these aspects by practically applying all the scientific production.

  • Funded research. This article is the result of a funded research project, derived from the contract signed by the main author and the Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology (MESCYT) to carry out her PhD thesis within the framework of the Education in Knowledge Society Programme of the University of Salamanca.

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  • Thanks. Thanks to the Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology (MESCyT) of the Dominican Republic.

  • Thanks to the Ministry of Education (MINERD) of the Dominican Republic.

  • Thanks to Miriam Camilo Recio - General Director of Adult education, Dominican Republic.

  • Thanks to the Department of Sociology and Communication of the University of Salamanca, for financing the translation of the article.

8. Annexes

Annex 1. Articles in WOS

 

Article (as registered in WOS)

Journal’s name (as registered in WOS)

1

Theoretical reflection on the methodological approach to education for youth and adults, a view from Latin America

SOPHIA-COLECCION DE FILOSOFIA DE LA EDUCACION

2

Pushouts, Shutouts, and Holdouts: Educational Experiences of Latino Immigrant Young Adults in New York City

URBAN EDUCATION

3

Does a college education reduce depressive symptoms in American young adults?

SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE

4

The sociocultural constructed multi-voiced self as a framework for Christian education of second-generation Korean American young adults

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

5

American youth - challenges for adult education

CONVERGENCE   

6

Comparative studies: notes on teacher training for the education of young and adults in the state of bahia (Brazil) and in the region of Valparaiso (Chile)

REVISTA PRAXIS EDUCACIONAL

7

The education of youth and adults in the brazilian prison system: what do the state plans in prisoneducation say?

REVISTA TEMPOS E ESPACOS EDUCACAO

8

Reflections theoretical-methodological about research on education of youth and adult workers in the brazilian federal network

REVISTA SAN GREGORIO   

9

Mapping of Information and Communication Technologies in Youth and Adult Education in the Northeast of Brazil

REVISTA EDUCAONLINE   

10

Environmental education in high school in young and adult education in Ilha Solteira city (SP - Brazil)

REMEA-REVISTA ELETRONICA DO MESTRADO EM EDUCACAO AMBIENTAL   

11

Analysis of Public Policies in Basic Education of Young People and Adults. A comparative analysis between Brazil and Mexico

REVISTA IBEROAMERICANA DE EDUCACION   

12

Education: dialogue on the literacy of young and adult in Brazil

LAPLAGE EM REVISTA   

13

Youth and adult education and vocational education in brazil: tracks and sidetracks in the context of diversity

HOLOS   

14

Comparative studies: notes on teacher training for the education of young and adults in the state of bahia (brazil) and in the region of Valparaiso (Chile)

REVISTA PRAXIS EDUCACIONAL   

15

Does adolescent motherhood affect education and labor market outcomes of mothers? A study on young adult women in Chile during 1990-2013

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

16

The criminality of former "special educational provision" permanently "excluded from school" adolescents as young adults (16-23): costs and practical implications

JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE

17

Analysis of Public Policies in Basic Education of Young People and Adults. A comparative analysis between Brazil and Mexico

REVISTA IBEROAMERICANA DE EDUCACION   

18

Transitions to adulthood for young people who Not in Employment, Education or Training (NEET) in Mexico, 2010

PAPELES DE POBLACION

19

In-state tuition for the undocumented: Education effects on Mexican young adults

JOURNAL OF POLICY ANALYSIS AND MANAGEMENT

20

A best practice in education and support services for independent living of intellectually disabled youth and adults in Mexico

SALUD PUBLICA DE MEXICO

21

SEX-EDUCATION AND FAMILY-PLANNING-SERVICES FOR YOUNG-ADULTS - ALTERNATIVE URBAN STRATEGIES IN MEXICO

STUDIES IN FAMILY PLANNING

22

How to keep young and adult people in the public educational system? Analysis of the strategies developed in three night-shift schools in Uruguay

PAGINAS DE EDUCACION   

23

Text Messaging for Sexual Communication and Safety Among African American Young Adults

QUALITATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH

24

Love and Hooking Up in the New Millennium: Communication Technology and Relationships among Urban African American and Puerto Rican Young Adults

JOURNAL OF SEX RESEARCH

25

The role of neighborhood and community in building developmental assets for children and youth: A national study of social norms among American adults

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY

26

Social identity and communicative boundaries - An analysis of youth and young adult street speakers in a US American community

COMMUNICATION RESEARCH

27

Teenage Pregnancy in Latino Communities: Young Adult Experiences and Perspectives of Sociocultural Factors

FAMILIES IN SOCIETY-THE JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL SERVICES

28

Aggressive communication traits: How similar are young adults and their parents in argumentativeness, assertiveness, and verbal aggressiveness

WESTERN JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION

29

Mapping of Information and Communication Technologies in Youth and Adult Education in the Northeast of Brazil

REVISTA EDUCAONLINE   

Annex 2. Articles in SCOPUS

 

Article (as registered in Scopus)

Journal’s name (as registered in Scopus)

30

'Ch'us mon propre Bescherelle': Challenges from the Hip-Hop nation to the Quebec nation

Journal of Sociolinguistics

31

Parent and family influences on young women's romantic and sexual decisions

Sex Education

32

Culture and risk assessments: Why latino americans perceive greater risk for diabetes

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology

33

Education reform in Bolivia: Transitions towards which future?

Research in Comparative and International Education

34

Estimates of obesity trends in Brazil, 2006-2009

International Journal of Public Health

35

Brazilian version of the protocole Montréal d'évaluation de la communication (protocole MEC): Normative and reliability data

Spanish Journal of Psychology

36

Studying the effects of an EFL curriculum for young adults in Brazil

English Language Teaching

37

Brazilian Indicator of Functional Literacy: How to evaluate the educational deficiencies of young adults in Brazil | [Indicador Nacional de Alfabetismo Funcional: Como avaliar as deficiências educacionais de jovens adultos no Brasil]

Meta: Avaliacao

38

= search 7

= search 7

39

Physician-patient communication about over-the-counter medications

Social Science and Medicine

40

Playful Dialogues of a Bilingual Child in Everyday Conversations: Foundations of Early Literacy

International Multilingual Research Journal

41

Playing school with a screen and a keyboard | [Jugar a la escuela con pantalla y teclado]

Education Policy Analysis Archives

Annex 3. Search legends in table 5

Legend

Search 1 = language: Spanish; keywords: Educa*, Comunic*; country; field: title

Search 2 = language: Spanish; keywords: Educa*, Comunic*, jov*, adul*; country; field: title

Search 3 = language: English; keywords: educat* Communic*; country; field: title

Search 4 = language: English; keywords: educat*, Communic*, yout*, adul*; country; field: title

Search 5 = language: Spanish; keywords: Educom*; country; field: title

Search 6 = language: Spanish; keywords: Educom*, jov*, adul*; country; field: title

Search 7 = language: English; keywords: Educomm*; country; field: title

Search 8 = language: English; keywords: Educomm*, yout*, adul*; country; field: title

Search 9 = language: Spanish; keywords: Educa*, Comunic*; country; field: subject or abstract (as appropriate)

Search 10 = language: Spanish; keywords: Educa*, comunic*, jov*, adul*; country; field: subject or abstract
(as appropriate)

Search 11 = language: English; keywords: educat* Communic*; country; field: subject or abstract
(as appropriate)

Search 12 = language: English; keywords: educat*, Communic*, yout*, adul*; country; field: subject or abstract
(as appropriate)

Search 13 = language: Spanish; keywords: Educom*; country; field: subject or abstract (as appropriate)

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(as appropriate)

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(as appropriate)

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(as appropriate) + filters

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Annex 4. Articles returning from searches 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 and 32

 

Article

Journal

42

Youth, gender & TIC: Imaginaries in the construction of information society in Latin American

ARBOR-CIENCIA PENSAMIENTO Y CULTURA

43

Interpersonal and personal factors influencing sexual debut among Mexican-American young women in the United States

JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH 

44

Evaluation of a school-based sex education program for low income male high school students in Chile

EVALUATION AND PROGRAM PLANNING 

45

Why the American public supports twenty-first century learning.

New directions for youth development

46

The Foundation and youth programs in Latin America and the Caribbean. Thinking about tomorrow | [La Fundacion y los programas juveniles en America Latina y el Caribe. Pensando en el manana.]

Desarrollo de base: revista de la Fundación Interamericana

47

Music as an experience integral to the ethnicity of the Mbya-Guarani of South America

MUSIC EDUCATION RESEARCH 

48

A curriculum for action in the community and intercultural citizenship in higher education

LANGUAGE CULTURE AND CURRICULUM 

49

Multilingual education policy and practice: Ten certainties (grounded in Indigenous experience)

Conferencia: Annual Conference of the American-Association-for-Applied-Linguistics

50

Mapping of Information and Communication Technologies in Youth and Adult Education in the Northeast of Brazil
= search 29

REVISTA EDUCAONLINE

51

The digital technologies of information and communication in the context of youth andadult education: a literature review (2007-2014)

REVISTA OLHRES

52

Social education and youth public policy: socio-educational experiences in Brazil and Portugal

REVISTA IBERO-AMERICANA DE ESTUDOS EM EDUCACAO

53

A quantitative approach to the television programs aimed to child and youth audience in Brazil

COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY-SPAIN

54

Education of young people and adults: a proposal for literacy and initiation to professionalization

LAPLAGE EM REVISTA

55

Studying the effects of an EFL curriculum for young adults in Brazil = search 36

English Language Teaching

56

Youth and adult Education: Contributions of papers in Brazilian journals indexed in SciELO database (2010-2014) | [Educação de jovens e adultos: Contribuições de artigos em periódicos Brasileiros indexados na base SciELO (2010-2014)]

Cadernos CEDES

57

Maria Teixeira School: A proposal for innovation in educational technology for social inclusion

2014 IEEE Canada International Humanitarian Technology Conference, IHTC

58

Evaluation of a school-based sex education program for low income male high school students in Chile
= search 44

EVALUATION AND PROGRAM PLANNING 

59

Implementation of ict in the Dominican Republic. an approach to teachers' perception

FONSECA-JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION

60

Smoking in Ecuador: Prevalence, knowledge, and attitudes

Tobacco Control

61

Migration and the Pursuit of Education in Southern Mexico

COMPARATIVE EDUCATION REVIEW 

62

Playing school with a screen and a keyboard | [Jugar a la escuela con pantalla y teclado]
= search 41

Education Policy Analysis Archives

63

Mathematical literacy and its development through elementary-education programs and occupations that do not require much schooling | [La alfabetización matemática y su relación con el intercambio comercial, la escolaridad elemental y el trabajo]

Bolema - Mathematics Education Bulletin

64

Multiple marginality and Urban education: Community and school socialization among low-income Mexican-descent youth

Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk

___________________________

How to cite this article in bibliographies / References

WR Sena Rivas, S Casillas Martín, M Cabezas González, A Barrientos (2019): “Educommunication in the context of youth and adult education in Latin America: A state of the art based on a systematic literature review”. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 74, pp. 133 a 171.
http://www.revistalatinacs.org/074paper/1325/08en.html
DOI: 10.4185/RLCS-2018-1325en

 

Article received on 2 0ctober 2018. Accepted on 26 December.
Published on 4 January 2019.

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